05 March 2009

Post Story on the Latest Defection at Catholic Charities

Disclaimer-- I have not had time to check into this story from my veritable bevy of behind-the-scenes sources, so read the following account with some caution. Remember the initial coverage of the St. Stan's debacle, for instance. However, it is a newsworthy item and so I wanted to post this for the record.

As I learn more, I will post more. Excerpts from the full story at STLToday:

Catholic Charities president latest leader to quit agency

By Tim Townsend
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
03/05/2009


The president of Catholic Charities resigned Friday, making him the latest in a long line of leaders to defect from the nonprofit organization since last fall.

Thomas Mulhearn, who has led the largest private provider of social services in Missouri for two years, will be replaced by Monsignor Mark Ullrich, a former associate director of Catholic Charities in the 1980s, and its current spiritual director.

Over the last four months, nearly a third of the organization's board of directors has resigned, as has its vice president for development.

Last October, Bishop Robert Hermann, acting leader of the St. Louis Archdiocese, sent Catholic Charities board members a memo saying the organization had been allowed "to drift in a direction that began to work contrary to the desires" of previous archbishops. He informed them that the relationship between the archdiocese and Catholic Charities was "at an impasse."

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3 comments:

Anonymous said...

ARE CATHOLIC CHARITIES CATHOLIC?

I invite and encourage anyone to investigate this. Mr. Blogger?

Go to the offices of Catholic Charities, see what services they provide, and I think you will see that there is no religious content their programs at all, and you find that most of the social workers there are not Catholic or are super liberal super dissenting Catholics.

You think St. Stan's is bad. Got to any Catholic Charities office, get to know the social workers, and they will make Fr. Bozek look like St. Thomas Aquinas! Social workers are, by profession, all of the same mindset of the former community organizer now going by the name "Mr. President."

Catholics do need to reach out to our neighbors in distress. Jesus commands that.

But Catholic Charities would be 100 times more effective if is was authentically Catholic in nature.

I believe it is true that the largest single funding source for Catholic Charities is this state and federal government.

In essence, thus, "Catholic" Charities becomes just a sub-contractor for the government, and is entirely secuarlized.

But, really, I don't have time to document solidly all this.

So, Mr. Blogger, maybe you can use your many contacts and informants to get the real skinny on this.

Maybe you can change Catholic Charities. Just think how that would bless so many poor people in our area who are struggling economically and spiritually.

Mother Teresa said clearly that spiritual poverty was much worse than financial poverty.

Best wishes,

Javier

Javier

Anonymous said...

OK, let me get this straight, Javier....only authentically catholic social workers (is that an oxymoron??) can be effective when working with the poor??? Amazing....simply amazing....

God save us!

Anonymous said...

Cut it out, Anonymous. Javier's comments lead nowhere near where you are trying to take this. Your comment on his text is the fruit of ideological eisigesis, not sound exegesis. He wrote:

"Go to the offices of Catholic Charities, see what services they provide, and I think you will see that there is no religious content their programs at all, and you find that most of the social workers there are not Catholic or are super liberal super dissenting Catholics." The first part of his sentence clarifies his position: he believes that CC itself provides its services outside of the faith context of the Catholic Church. The occasional non-Catholic professional can (if carefully selected - but not automatially) help deliver services within the spirit of the Church. In this case, the sposnoring institution that has brought CC into existence as an extension of its mission is the Church and therefore has a justifiable interest in seeing that her mission is carried out according to her defining values. Now, it seems as if even the Chancery is longer convinced that CC is being faithful on these grounds. Javier does not seem to be intimating that non-Catholics on the staff are the cause of these problems, simply noting that it is no wonder that the hometeam cause is imperiled, seemingly because in terms of membership and philosophy combined, the Catholicity of the mission has been diminished. Ordianrily this might not be necessarily good or bad, but in the case of an entity founded and maintaiend by the Church, it is a huge problem.