19 September 2009

Some Early Stills of the Pontifical Mass with Archbishop Burke






Thanks to Zach Edgar for sending me these still shots from the video he took of today's Solemn Pontifical High Mass at St. Agnes Home for the jubilee of the
Carmelites of the Divine Heart of Jesus.

I still hope to get some more photos, but I thought these might tide readers over until then.

It was a beautiful Mass, and a lovely reception. Seeing the smiles on the faces of these beautiful and faithful sisters was worth it by itself. But they had great food, too, which sealed the deal.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

May God grant Archbishop Burke a long life and great blessings!

Anonymous said...

One noteworthy aspect of the Solemn Pontifical High Mass is the fact that all the Sacred Ministers, servers, and sacristans (with two exceptions) were diocesan priests and seminarians. Additionally, the Master of Ceremonies who planned the Mass and instructed servers is a transitional deacon for the Archdiocese of St. Louis. His leadership and example of holiness have had a profound impact on other diocesan seminarians studying at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary. May God continue to bless the efforts of priests and seminarians who strive to restore His Sacred Liturgy.

Cato said...

Something is amiss. Does a solemn High Mass require two different hats? Surely, His Grace wouldn't do such a thing merely to confuse the pewsitters.

thetimman said...

Cato, yes, pontifical high Mass calls for two different mitres-- called the precious (pretiosa) and the golden (auriphrygiata), as indicated by the pictures. The liturgical history of it I know not, but a reader might, perhaps?

Anonymous said...

Cato, Good eyes and question

billj4250 said...

Can I assume that the Mass instruction also calls for the deacons to wear birettas? I've never seen this before.

Also, with all due respect to a previous anonymous commenter, "God's Sacred Liturgy" (i.e., the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass) is celebrated every day, almost everywhere in the world. Why does it need to be "restored" if it (including the Latin version) hasn't gone away?

Cato said...

Timman...

Thanks for the instruction. One of the joys of a slow but inexorable transition from the Episcopalian church is the opportunity to learn about, and to revel in, the magnificent history of Roman Catholic liturgy and rubrics.

Anonymous said...

Billj4250,
Restoration does not necessarily imply that something has "gone away." One restores a house to ensure its structural integrity and recover its original beauty and charm. We can speak of the restoration of the Sacred Liturgy in a similar way. It is true that the Mass is celebrated throughout the world, but efforts to restore the rich tradition, symbolism, and beauty of Catholic worship are vital to our faith and certainly laudable.