17 June 2010

Forty-Two Years Later...

...It looks as though there will be a fairly accurate English translation of the New Mass.

5 comments:

athanasius_magnus said...

How funny would it be if the Novus Ordo was finally scrapped after all this bickering and finally an agreement on the translation? Whoops!

Anonymous said...

The new translation is in my opinion an attempt to fix a problem without looking at Bugnini's deception and false implementation of the real liturgical intentions of the Vat II Council Fathers. The Paul VI Missal itself is a major problem.
Other things needs restoring. Removal of indult for communion on the hand. Restoration of facing East during Mass.
Reinstitution of minor orders and no female altar servers.

Robert said...

You'll still have, guitar music, liturgical dancing, altar girls and EMHCs. Big whoop!.

Anonymous said...

...and while we're at it, let's return celebration of the Eucharist to where it belongs...in the catacombs!

Athelstane said...

Anonymous 00:42 is right about the superficial (if much needed) nature of correction that the new ICEL English translation represents - yet it still does not address the fundamental (note, not fatal) weaknesses in the Paul VI missal. It is not just the rubrics, important as these are; it is the very structure and prayers of the mass itself.

Scholars such as Lauren Pristas of Caldwell College and Alcuin Reid have begun to detail just how far-reaching and unprecedented the changes introduced into the Roman Rite by the Consilium were, and just how much and in what ways they shifted the theological emphasis of the mass. Were such massive changes introduced today and implemented so hastily as were those of 1967-1970 were, there would be an enormous hue and cry, and understandably so. And yet this was done without any compunction in the formation and implementation of the novus ordo missal. Ironically it was largely the still-deeply ingrained Catholic habit of obedience that made this possible. That habit is long since gone and buried.

I do think that a more fundamental reform of the new order of the mass is in the cards, though I doubt it will be done according to my preference, i.e., starting from the 1962 missal as its basis. But it is (I am coming to think, reluctantly) regrettably necessary, alas, for a considerably larger critical mass of clergy and laity supportive of such a project and a diminution of potential core opposition before it can take place. Which is to say probably another 15-20 years out, when much of the older generation most wedded to the most liberal aspects of the new missal will have retired and gone to their reward and so many of the up and coming (much more traditionally oriented) classes of young priests reach positions of leadership in the Church. At that point, perhaps, we could see restored many or most of the original and ancient collects and prefaces, a revisiting of the lectionary, and so on. In the meantime, it's just going to be gradual brick by brick corrections to the translation, some of the rubrics, and so on.

At least that's what I am left to hope for. Rome was burned in a day but it was not rebuilt in one.