09 January 2011

Photos from the Te Deum and Reception for Cardinal Burke

Happy Feast of the Holy Family to everybody. A few photos from generous reader Phil appear below. I had trouble with the lighting inside the Church at and after dusk. Mother Crab's blog has lots of really great photos, including during the ceremony.

If you missed the Solemn High Mass today for the Feast of the Holy Family, you missed a great sermon by Monsignor R. Michael Schmitz, Vicar General and U.S. Provincial Superior for the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest.

The Te Deum on Saturday was beautiful, and the reception was also very nice. His Eminence received the faithful for well over two hours before getting a well-earned dinner.

Entering Church in the Cappa Magna:
In the reception hall:
Oratory Rector, Canon Michael K. Wiener, with His Excellency, the Most Reverend Everard de Jong, Auxiliary Bishop of Roermond, Netherlands:
His Eminence speaks to the faithful, Monsignor Schmitz to his left:
His Eminence greeting Canon Jason Apple, formerly Vicar at the Oratory:

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I read the following and immediately thought of you. It's by Fr. Richard Rohr:

Today, many young people and clergy long to return to an earlier and false innocence that never existed. I understand these psychological needs. We must start with some experience of order, or we will not have the ego structure to move forward. In the first half of life, the psyche demands structure before it can possibly deal with anti-structure.
These young people want to return to a romanticized church and world of the past that they idealize from a distance. They hope that it will provide the clarity, status, and certitude that they do not enjoy and that their ego needs.
We all need some still point in the midst of the tornado of postmodernism. But the trouble is, all the biblical God ever promised us was God himself as that still point—never an institution, role, social order or country. These are human-created idols that we worship in the place of God.

thetimman said...

Funny. But I think the real divide is that young and faithful Catholics see the psycho-jargon for what it is-- a blind to distract people from the truth. It appeals to the ego of the modernist, who thinks that adopting this mindset puts him in the smart set, and that he is above traditional notions of truth, beauty, transcendance and the like. He makes his own reality.

It is the ancient lie, of which the Popes have repeatedly warned us, particularly St. Pius X.

Anti-structure? Come on.

The biblical God did, in fact, promise us an institution that would be the guarantor of truth. It is the Catholic Church. Read Matthew 16 for a start. And really, get to know her, for she is the only gateway to salvation. Citing Richard Rohr may not be of much comfort to anyone at the particular judgement.

I beg you, please become familiar with the teachings of the Church with an open mind, asking God for the gift of faith.

Young and Opinionated said...

Speaking as a "young person," I find the above comment offensive. No one can categorize people in a sweeping statement like that- not even if you're a priest. It's completely obvious this priest is not in favor of the current movement. True, psychologically, everyone must have order- especially in their young, formative years- and they DO get it in the family as well as the church setting (society too, sometimes). Why do we have to go with psychology here, though? Why are we talking about individual ego?
Not saying I go to Mass, confession, etc. for my ego.
What about GOD?
And why would one allude to lack of order in the Traditional Roman Catholic Church? This is an unfair statement.
I'm a little confused by this. There is order and everything has it's place. There has ALWAYS been order in the Church.
I don't think people are trying to turn back the clock in all realms of life. How many of us could be pegged as a "Traditional Catholic" on the street with complete certainty? "They" are everywhere! In major cities, men and women, as lawyers, doctors, etc. They pay taxes! They vote!
And they're far less crazy or deluded than you seem to think.