17 May 2014

"Wherein Lost Hopes are Found"




'A child with talent had to be kept “at the piano; so twice a week in summer and once a week in winter Thea went over the gulch to the Kohlers', though the Ladies' Aid Society thought it was not proper for their preacher's daughter to go "where there was so much drinking." Not that the Kohler sons ever so much as looked at a glass of beer. They were ashamed of their old folks and got out into the world as fast as possible; had their clothes made by a Denver tailor and their necks shaved up under their hair and forgot the past. Old Fritz and Wunsch, however, indulged in a friendly bottle pretty often. The two men were like comrades; perhaps the bond between them was the glass wherein lost hopes are found; perhaps it was common memories of another country; perhaps it was the grapevine in the garden—knotty, fibrous shrub, full of homesickness and sentiment, which the Germans have carried around the world with them.'

--Willa Sibert Cather, The Song of the Lark


3 comments:

Long-Skirts said...

"notty, fibrous shrub, full of homesickness and sentiment, which the Germans have carried around the world with them.'"

Wow! Wonderful decription.

thetimman said...

Long-skirts, I agree! I think the descriptions of the characters from the first few chapters in that book are as good as any I've read. Cather can write.

Cathy D said...

I think I've read all of Willa Cather's novels. My idea of a great vacation is driving through that part of the country!