12 April 2016

This is Why Catholic Literature Matters

This guest post at Rorate Caeli is nothing short of brilliant.  Must read.  And if you haven't read Brideshead Revisited-- I'm looking at you, pal-- get off the stick and do it.

7 comments:

Long-Skirts said...

This is absolutely BRILLIANT!

“to set up a rival good to God’s”

dulac90 said...

I read the piece earlier and agree that it is fantastic. Now I don't have to read Brideshead, though!

Christophe said...

Bottom line - no one will want to belong to Francis' vacuous, insipid church-without-rules. The exodus will accelerate.

thetimman said...

But I do very much want to remain Catholic. And the integrity of the Church's claim is necessary to that.

Of course it is a complete disaster.

JDD said...

This quote perhaps sums up best my relationship with current pack in Rome:

"Here my last love died—as I lay in that dark hour, I was aghast to realize that something within me, long sickening, had quietly died, and felt as a husband might feel, who, in the fourth year of his marriage, suddenly knew that he had no longer any desire, or tenderness, or esteem, for a once-beloved wife; no pleasure in her company, no wish to please, no curiosity about anything she might ever do or say or think; no hope of setting things right, no self-reproach for the disaster. I knew it all, the whole drab compass of marital disillusion; we had been through it together, the Army and I, from the first importunate courtship until now, when nothing remained to us except the chill bonds of law and duty and custom. I had played every scene in the domestic tragedy, had found the early tiffs become more frequent, the tears less affecting, the reconciliations less sweet, till they engendered a mood of aloofness and cool criticism, and the growing conviction that it was not myself but the loved one who was at fault.

I caught the false notes in her voice and learned to listen for them apprehensively; I recognized the blank, resentful stare of incomprehension in her eyes, and the selfish, hard set of the comers of her mouth. I learned her, as one must learn a woman one has kept house with, day in, day out, for three and a half years; I learned her slatternly ways, the routine and mechanism of her charm her jealousy and self-seeking and her nervous trick with the fingers when she was lying. She was stripped of all enchantment now and I knew her for an uncongenial stranger to whom I had bound myself indissolubly in a moment of folly."

gracem said...

I also read it and it is brilliant!!

Karen said...

Thank you for that!!! It was absolutely brilliant!! I LOVE this book. Going to start it again immediately.