29 September 2016

Pope Francis Spoke to Me Today

It took more than three years since that portentous day His Holiness stepped out on the balcony above St. Peter's Square and cooly surveyed the field, truly "white already to harvest."  But it finally happened. The Holy Father gave a homily with me directly in mind.

I have been experiencing, perhaps coincidentally for a little more than three years now, feelings of spiritual desolation and a state of generalized sadness.  Who knows why? Certainly, things in the Church and the world at large have never been better.

And also coincidentally, I have recently discovered the wonderfully distracting power of Kentucky straight bourbon.  

As though he looked right through me, His Holiness gave a homily the other day that proves that the charism of the office operates regardless of the occupant, as Caiphas proved in his prophecy that it was better for one man to be sacrificed than the whole nation. Even the hint of the number of doses of distraction is simply uncanny.  From CNA:

Vatican City, Sep 27, 2016 / 02:32 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Feelings of spiritual desolation, or a lack of will to live, should be combated with prayer, not with sleeping pills or alcohol – things that only distract us from the problem – Pope Francis said Tuesday.

“We need to understand that when our soul is in this state of generalized sadness we can barely breathe: This happens to all of us… whether strong or not,” the Pope said in a homily Sept. 27. We need to “understand what goes on in our hearts.”

[...] 

In his homily, Pope Francis reflected on the day's first reading, which is from the Book of Job, saying “Spiritual desolation makes us feel as though our souls are crushed, we can’t succeed, we can’t succeed and we also don’t want to live.”

[...]

Instead of giving in to this despair, or trying to distract ourselves from our problems by taking sleeping pills or drinking “one, two, three or four glasses” of alcohol, which “do not help,” Francis said we should pray.

[...]

Pope Francis emphasized that spiritual desolation is something that happens to everyone and said that the first step is to recognize within ourselves when we are having these moments of hopelessness or when we don't understand why something is happening.

[...]

Offering advice for when we encounter a person who is suffering or experiencing a sense of desolation, the Pope said we should be silent; “but a silence with much love, closeness and caresses. And we must not make speeches that don’t help in the end and even can do harm.”


4 comments:

The Bear said...

Sadness or spiritual dryness? Or clinical depression? Happens to everybody? Sleeping pill = alcohol abuse? What about anti-depresants? Where in all of this is any insight to people with mental illness? The Church only seems to remember them when they want to divert attention from a Muslim terrorist's religious motives.

Mother Crab said...

❤️

Anonymous said...

Offering advice for when we encounter a person who is suffering or experiencing a sense of desolation, the Pope said we should be silent; “but a silence with much love, closeness and caresses. And we must not make speeches that don’t help in the end and even can do harm.”

I'm not caressing you Timman, no matter what Pope Francis says.

Also, this is perfect Timman bait:

http://www.weeklystandard.com/the-case-for-trump/article/2004680

Proud (Former) SLPS Parent

Elizabeth said...

"And we must not make speeches that don’t help in the end and even can do harm." Oh my. I guess I'd better watch my tongue in the future when tempted to offer someone in need the address of the next nearby AA or NA meeting. Tsk Tsk. Pushy me.