24 October 2016

Seemingly Good, but either Bad or Hypocrite or Ill"

So says Pope Francis of those Catholics who seek to follow the moral law as expressed in Catholic doctrine. As Hilary White said, I think there is a fourth logical possibility here.

Contrast this with the Introit and Epistle from Sunday's Mass. First, the Introit, so beautiful an expression of how God wishes us well and longs for us to call upon him:

INTROIT Jer. 29:11, 12, 14

Said the Lord: "I think thoughts of peace and not of affliction. You shall call upon Me and I will hear you, and I will bring you back from captivity from all places."

God is not looking to "do us in", but to save us. But He desires our cooperation in this salvation-- he waits for us to call upon Him and follow Him in truth. St. Paul confirms that we are called to actually follow Him, to conform to Him as our pattern-- that means keeping His commandments:

Brethren: Be ye followers of me, and mark those who walk after the pattern you have in us. For many walk, of whom I have told you often (and now tell you weeping) that they are enemies of the cross of Christ: Whose end is destruction: whose God is their belly: and whose glory is in their shame: who mind earthly things. But our conversation is in heaven: from whence also we look for the Saviour, our Lord Jesus Christ, Who will reform the body of our lowness, made like to the body of his glory, according to the operation whereby also he is able to subdue all things unto himself. (Philipp. 3:17-21; 4:1-3).

So, I think that it might just be possible that to seek to conform to the law of God means that a person may be something other than bad, a hypocrite, or ill.  Maybe that person is striving for holiness? That's still a good thing, right?

So, when the whole world and the pope, too, are against you for trying to get to heaven, don't worry.  Remember:

Said the Lord: "I think thoughts of peace and not of affliction. You shall call upon Me and I will hear you, and I will bring you back from captivity from all places."

Persevere, brothers.

5 comments:

Liam Ronan said...

Francis abhors rigidity.

“Hier stehe Ich, Ich kann nicht anders."
("Here I stand, I can do no other")” - Martin Luther -

Perhaps Francis is excoriating Martin Luther?

Peggy said...

You, with your proper grammar, using a masculine for the indefinite, excluded "sisters." Boo-hoo! I'm running to my safe space. Then I'm gonna tell Francis on you.

But I digress. Je suis d'accord, monsieur.

Catechist Kev said...

"Francis abhors rigidity. "

Yes, Pope Francis seems rather rigid in his complaints/beliefs about rigidity. (s/)

Catechist Kev

traddadof4 said...

I looked at the Hillary White essay and could not find the fourth possibility. What is it?

JBQ said...

The agenda is coming into focus. There is an economic aspect and there is a social aspect. Capitalism is too rigid and must be destroyed. The interpretation of the family is too rigid and must be expanded.