29 February 2016

Another Victory for the Institute Way?

A lot of baseball fans dislike the St. Louis Cardinals.  Probably it is because they have won, often, in the last twenty years.  Oldsters like me remember when the Yankees won nearly every year.  Those who are (as my daughter says) "oldies oldier" also remember when the Yankees of other eras won nearly every year.  

So, that's one thing, but winning compounds what is a truism for every team and every set of fans:  there are certain quirks, parochialisms, and preset narratives that can be seen as either cute (if you're losing or just starting to win) or as annoying to the point of rage (if you are winning fairly regularly).  

Among these for Cardinals are the moniker "best fans in baseball", or BFIB (nod to the late, great Joe Strauss).  Somebody noted once that the Cardinals draw a lot of fans, win or lose, and that they seem as a group fairly knowledgeable about the nuances of the game.  Great.  But telling people they're great has never been, in my observation, a successful means of inducing humility. So, now we have this gag-inducing, locally promoted BFIB identity.  I can see how that would rub a fan of other teams the wrong way. There are knowledgeable and not-knowledgeable fans everywhere. No city has the market cornered on stupidity.

And lately, which is less the Cardinals' fault and more the national media's fault, we are stuck with the idea of the "Cardinal Way", as a substitute for "playing the game the right way" as in "the way oldsters played it before young people found out that fun was allowed in sports". In reality, the Cardinal Way began as a term to describe certain instructional methods and strategies in long-term player development.  But I digress.  Ask anyone outside of our fair town and they hate the Cardinals, their BFIB, and their "Way".

What does this have to do with the Institute? Well, nothing.  And something.

As I alluded to in my piece on the papal approval of the Institute's constitutions, the Institute is sometimes criticized for a perception that they are not as combative as they should be in fighting the fight against the destruction of the faith, or the promotion of all things traditional.  That they are just itching to compromise on something. Yet, they thrive in promoting all these things without leaving a large wake as they pass. They foster good relationships with the hierarchy of the Church, with bishops who support them and with bishops you would assume would be just as happy if they went away. This organizational attitude frustrates some.

Now, enter the news that the Archdiocese of Chicago has relented in their plans to demolish the Shrine of Christ the King and has deeded the church and the land to the Institute.  How did that happen?  Without assigning blame or praise, it was fairly clear that the Institute didn't want it demolished, and that the Archdiocese did.  And we know the Institute never makes waves, right?

So, without any public criticism of the Archdiocese, also without undercutting the efforts of the group of faithful donors who wanted to act, the Institute quietly went about its business.  

And the Shrine is now theirs, and restoration will be attempted after all.

Think of it as the Institute Way. But really, it's just the Salesian Way.  Truth, charity, trust in Providence.  Voila.  

This is just my take. I don't speak for the Institute, as you know. But I'll give them credit on this one, because I couldn't see it happening.  

Congratulations to all the faithful in Chicago whose prayers and efforts have been rewarded.

26 February 2016

Question

Is the cruise ship fundraiser the Catholic apologist's version of any TV program casting Ted McGinley?

24 February 2016

Can We Stand for Something, Anything? Back the Bishop!

Look at this photo.  See these adorable little girls, just doing what generations have done.  Girl Scouts at their finest.  These are the poor little urchins that our evil Archbishop is trying to make cry. See their innocence?  Don't you just feel for them?  Boo! With all the problems in the world, with Our Beloved Holy Father urging mercy and love, why is the Archdiocese picking on these poor little girls!?

That is what you are to think.  Yes, there are bigger problems, but who gives a fig? Any effort in favor of the faith and the natural law by a member of the hierarchy should be enthusiastically cheered. Yes, there are bigger problems, but why not just take them one at a time.  

And in a way, it takes a lot more guts to stand out against the poor little girl scouts than to deny Communion to Joe Biden (though of course do that, too).

Who is harming the girls here?  The Archbishop, taking an action to defend the faith and thus only slightly indirectly to protect their immortal souls? Or maybe the parents and scout leaders who, through indolence or lack of duty, throw their daughters to the baby-killing and natural law-defying harpies behind the curtain?  No, the problem couldn't be us, could it?

Can we please for once just back a Bishop doing the right thing?

If you can, get in the comboxes on these articles.  Write the Archbishop to thank and encourage him. It's a "small" step, but tell me why we should ignore any good news at this particular time?

Are You Surprised?

Trump wins more Latino votes in Nevada than anyone else. 

For all of you dear readers, Catholic, who are perplexed by the Trump candidacy, this website has an interesting discussion of things.  The link is for one particular post, but navigate around, interesting stuff.

23 February 2016

Pope's Message for Today

From Rome Reports:

Pope Francis criticized Christians during Mass on Tuesday at Casa Santa Marta.

He described Christianity as a religion that must act for good, not a "religion of saying” made of hypocrisy and vanity.
Pope Francis censured Christians who treat the faith as though it were window dressing, without obligations.

"Perhaps they have their parents in a nursing home, but always are busy and cannot go and visit them and so leave them there, abandoned. ‘But I am very Catholic: I belong to that association,’ [they say]. This is the religion of saying: I say it is so, but I do according to the ways of the world.”...


Words to ponder.



Something to Keep You Going This Lent

A difficult Lent for me, personally, this year. Fuzzy goals, little focus, very small victories, laziness, and an unidentifiable yearning for something.  Wait, that's every day of the year.  

Hope yours is better.

Anyway, I saw this video this morning and wanted to post it as a kind of encouragement, at least for myself if not for you. It might strike some of you as a little out-of-character for the judgemental troglodyte who writes this blog.  But anyway.

I am still awaiting my go-ahead to take the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.  Within the past few years, it has reached a popularity unknown in its history, if numbers are any guide.  People walk it for all sorts of reasons: health, inner peace, bucket list checking, for travel, cultural reasons, "spirituality"-- as defined by our decrepit times, and maybe for a reason to write books.

But this little video is a nice reminder that it is a religious pilgrimage-- open to anyone, but at its heart that most thoroughly Catholic of endeavors to venerate the relics of St. James the Greater, after undergoing the voluntary and hopefully expiatory suffering of a 500 mile walk spanning more than a month.  It is a metaphor for our earthly pilgrimage, which we pray will end with the attainment of heaven.  On a smaller scale, it is also a metaphor for a good Lent.  

So, here it is:
 

What a. Surprise?

FBI issued this statement at the news:

21 February 2016

Bob Knows

The river whispers in my ear
I've hardly a penny to my name
The heavens never seemed so near
All of my body glows with flame

The tempest struggles in the air
And to myself alone I sing
It could sink me then and there
I can hear the echoes ring

I tried to find one smiling face
To drive the shadow from my head
I'm stranded in this nameless place
Lying restless in a heavy bed

Tell me straight out if you will
Why must you torture me within?
Why must you come from your high hill?
Throw my fate to the clouds and wind

Far away in a silent land
Secret thoughts are hard to bear
Remember me, you'll understand
Emotions we can never share

You trampled on me as you passed
Left the coldest kiss upon my brow
All of my doubts and fears have gone at last
I've nothing more to tell you now

I walk by tranquil lakes and streams
As each new season's dawn awaits
I lay awake at night with troubled dreams
The enemy is at the gate

Beneath the thunder blasted trees
The words are ringin' off your tongue
The ground is hard in times like these
The stars are cold, the night is young

The rocks are bleak, the trees are bare
Iron clouds go floating by
Snowflakes fallin' in my hair
Beneath the gray and stormy sky

The evenin' sun is sinkin' low
The woods are dark, the town is too
They'll drag you down, they'll run the show
Ain't no telling what they'll do

Tell ol' Bill when he comes home
That anything is worth a try
Tell him that I'm not alone
And that the hour has come to do or die

All the world I would defy
Let me make it plain as day
I look at you now and I sigh
How could it be any other way?


--Bob Dylan, Tell Ol' Bill


John 16: 16-33




A little while, and now you shall not see me; and again a little while, and you shall see me: because I go to the Father.

Then some of the disciples said one to another: What is this that he saith to us: A little while, and you shall not see me; and again a little while, and you shall see me, and, because I go to the Father? They said therefore: What is this that he saith, A little while? we know not what he speaketh. And Jesus knew that they had a mind to ask him; and he said to them: Of this do you inquire among yourselves, because I said: A little while, and you shall not see me; and again a little while, and you shall see me. Amen, amen I say to you, that you shall lament and weep, but the world shall rejoice; and you shall be made sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. A woman, when she is in labour, hath sorrow, because her hour is come; but when she hath brought forth the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world. So also you now indeed have sorrow; but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice; and your joy no man shall take from you.

And in that day you shall not ask me any thing. Amen, amen I say to you: if you ask the Father any thing in my name, he will give it you. Hitherto you have not asked any thing in my name. Ask, and you shall receive; that your joy may be full.

These things I have spoken to you in proverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak to you in proverbs, but will shew you plainly of the Father. In that day you shall ask in my name; and I say not to you, that I will ask the Father for you: For the Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again I leave the world, and I go to the Father.

His disciples say to him: Behold, now thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb. Now we know that thou knowest all things, and thou needest not that any man should ask thee. By this we believe that thou camest forth from God. Jesus answered them: Do you now believe? Behold, the hour cometh, and it is now come, that you shall be scattered every man to his own, and shall leave me alone; and yet I am not alone, because the Father is with me. These things I have spoken to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you shall have distress: but have confidence, I have overcome the world.



19 February 2016

Scalia Funeral Tomorrow, RIP

Photo from the Daily Mail; widow Maureen in center; son Fr. Paul Scalia looking very priestly on the right

Good for Archbishop Carlson: Calls on Parishes to Find Alternatives to Girl Scouts

It's about time, considering the national Girl Scout organization's steady and increasing support of an agenda antithetical to the Natural Law and Catholic moral teaching. His Grace didn't immediately forbid Girl Scouts from Catholic parishes, but I hope that this call to find and consider alternatives will eventually lead to that.

Now, on to the CCHD...

From STLToday:

St. Louis Archbishop Robert Carlson has issued a letter calling on parishes to seek alternatives to Girl Scouts, arguing that the program and related organizations conflict with Catholic teaching.

The Archdiocese of St. Louis isn't directly kicking Girl Scout troops and activities off of all church properties, but is suggesting they and their cookies may no longer be welcome in the fold.

"Girl Scouts is exhibiting a troubling pattern of behavior and it is clear to me that as they move in the ways of the world it is becoming increasingly incompatible with our Catholic values," Carlson wrote in a letter dated Thursday. "We must stop and ask ourselves — is Girl Scouts concerned with the total well-being of our young women? Does it do a good job forming the spiritual, emotional, and personal well-being of Catholic girls?"

The letter does not mandate that parishes disband Girl Scout troops. Rather, it calls on them to seek alternatives.

"I am asking each pastor that allows Girl Scout troops to meet on parish property to conduct a meeting with troop leadership to review these concerns and discuss implementing alternative options for the formation of our girls," Carlson wrote.

His letter takes aim not only at Girl Scouts, but affliated organizations, including Girl Scouts USA and the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts.

"GSUSA resources and social media highlight and promote role models in conflict with Catholic values, such as Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan," Carlson wrote.

"Organizations that GSUSA promotes and partners with are conflict with Catholic values, such as Amnesty International, Coalition for Adolescent Girls, OxFam and more. This is especially troubling in regards to sex education and advocacy for “reproductive rights” (i.e. abortion and contraceptive access, even for minors)."

On an Archdiocesan website, a question-and-answer page seeks to explain how Girl Scouts conflicts with Catholic teaching. Among the questions: "Can I still buy Girl Scout Cookies?"


[...]

__________________

As usual, if you want your fill of anti-Catholic hatred and bigotry, read the comments that follow the story.





This Tim! Laughed Out Loud

This article at the Remnant's "Onion"-type news service about Donald Trump running for Pope is hilarious.  Just hilarious.  Go check it out.

But the best thing about it is that, cloaked in satire and parody, it is a devastating and fairly comprehensive dismantling of the post-V2 and post-novus ordo Church.

Instant classic.

Court Affirms Diocese’s Freedom to Operate According to Catholic Teaching

Thanks to Pewsitter for posting a link to this piece of good news:



KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A Missouri court Tuesday rejected the primary claim of a former Catholic diocese ministry worker who sued the diocese for terminating her employment once leadership learned of her same-sex union.

The court ruled that the First Amendment’s guarantee of the free exercise of religion means the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City–St. Joseph is free to make its employment decisions without court interference. Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys representing the diocese filed a motion for summary judgment last year asking for this result.

“A church isn’t obligated to employ those who act contrary to the church’s teachings. The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed this as recently as four years ago,” said ADF Senior Counsel Erik Stanley. “The district court was on very firm constitutional ground to reject this attempt to drag the government into a church’s theological decisions – the very line the First Amendment says the government cannot cross.”

[...]

In July 2013, Colleen Simon began working as director for social ministries for St. Francis Xavier Parish in the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City–St. Joseph. The priest at St. Francis ended Simon’s employment in May 2014 after an article appeared in the Kansas City Star that described her as married to another woman. The diocese explained to Simon that her same-sex union “contradicts Church laws, discipline, and teaching and the diocesan Policy on Ethics and Integrity in Ministry.”

In its summary judgment order in Simon v. Catholic Diocese of Kansas City–St. Joseph, the Jackson County Circuit Court wrote that “although cloaked in the guise of ostensibly religiously-neutrally-applicable fraud claims, it can be fairly stated that [Simon]’s averments…come more manifestly frocked as employment discrimination claims against an ecclesiastical entity. ...

18 February 2016

It's almost as if Donald Trump supported the Traditional Mass

Is this a case of "Change of plan: Judge all you want."? Perhaps only when it comes to Donald Trump.

OK, well, a little context.  The Pope's remarks include an "if" after the statement, to qualify the remark.  Not especially effective, as it still stands for a readiness to "judge" should the conditions be fulfilled.  But hey, if a Pope can't decide who is or is not a Christian (at least who is a part of the One visible Church of Christ), then who can?  

But recall, he is the one who asked "Who am I to judge?".  Now if Trump were committing or advocating sodomy, no judgement.  Advocating a border fence, well...

Trump responded, as you knew he would.  Though I doubt he could say "good morning" without a certain amount of bombast, he gives the Pope an out in the end, attributing the statements to him having been manipulated by others.  That may or may not be true.

But Trump's last paragraph is just, and shows some sensitivity to such an unprovoked attack.  Here is the full response:

If and when the Vatican is attacked by ISIS, which as everyone knows is ISIS’s ultimate trophy, I can promise you that the Pope would have only wished and prayed that Donald Trump would have been President because this would not have happened. ISIS would have been eradicated unlike what is happening now with our all talk, no action politicians.

The Mexican government and its leadership has made many disparaging remarks about me to the Pope, because they want to continue to rip off the United States, both on trade and at the border, and they understand I am totally wise to them. The Pope only heard one side of the story – he didn’t see the crime, the drug trafficking and the negative economic impact the current policies have on the United States. He doesn’t see how Mexican leadership is outsmarting President Obama and our leadership in every aspect of negotiation.

For a religious leader to question a person’s faith is disgraceful. I am proud to be a Christian and as President I will not allow Christianity to be consistently attacked and weakened, unlike what is happening now, with our current President. No leader, especially a religious leader, should have the right to question another man’s religion or faith. They are using the Pope as a pawn and they should be ashamed of themselves for doing so, especially when so many lives are involved and when illegal immigration is so rampant. 

I don't care to speak to the first two paragraphs in light of the nature of this blog.  But, the last paragraph compels. Again, for my more "liberal" readers, I have no problem with any Pope using his authority to declare someone outside the Church-- there is a procedure, there is a name, there is recourse for the sinner-- no, what I am talking about here is the (public, no less) labeling of someone as a "non-Christian" for benefit of the press or to advance a political agenda.  His Holiness hasn't done that for public sodomites or adulterers or supporters of infanticide. The real question is "Why now?"

It's almost as if Donald Trump supported the Traditional Mass.

Photo Captures Exact Instant Twin Towers Fall

No, wait-- it's the Boone Bridge. Sorry.

Remember This When You Hear from Your Orthodox Friends that Rome Broke Away from Them

"We define that the Holy Apostolic See and the Roman Pontiff have primacy over the entire universe; that the same Roman Pontiff is the successor of Blessed Peter, Prince of the Apostles; he is the authentic Vicar of Christ, Head of the entire Church, Father and Doctor of all Christians; that Our Lord Jesus Christ has transmitted to him, in the person of Blessed Peter, full power to nourish, sustain and govern the Universal Church, as is attested also in the Acts of the Ecumenical Councils’ and in the Sacred Canons” (Conciliorum Oecumenicorum Decreta, Centro Editoriale Dehoniano, Bologna 2013, pp. 523-528).

This is a dogmatic declaration signed by the Patriarchs of the Eastern Sees, including those of Constantinople and Moscow, at the Council of Florence in 1439-- a Council in which the Emperor of Constantinople himself participated.

This passage, as part of a very interesting discussion of the history of the schism and eastern churches that chose the path of fidelity to Rome, in light of the recent joint statement of schismatic patriarch Kirill and the Patriarch of the West, comes from Rorate Caeli.


Oh. Great. News?

From CNN:

U.S. Stationing tanks and artillery in classified Norwegian caves


17 February 2016

Ferrara on Scalia

A believing Catholic lawyer-- such is the man Scalia was, and so this reflection by another believing Catholic lawyer, Christopher Ferrara, I found insightful.  Published at Fatima Perspectives, I reprint it shamelessly below in full, to honor a great man and to spur myself to focus on the real during the time I have left.  May God grant repose to the soul of Antonin Scalia, and may He have mercy on us all at our death.

__________________



Justice Antonin Scalia, RIP
by Christopher A. Ferrara
February 16, 2016

The father of nine children, with one a priest, it is said that Antonin Scalia commuted from his home in Virginia with all nine of his children in order to attend the Latin Mass at Old Saint Mary’s in Washington. As a Catholic growing up in the 1940s, Justice Scalia would have been enrolled in the Brown Scapular at the time of his First Communion. And as a student at Xavier High School in New York City, an elite Jesuit military academy from which he graduated first in his class in 1953, he probably had a sound catechetical formation. He may even have made his nine first Fridays in the school chapel.

There is good reason, then, for confidence that this giant of American jurisprudence will not be deprived of an eternal reward.  But still the suddenness of his passing, in a guest room during a weekend hunting trip far from his family, shocks us.   We are reminded of the fleeting quality of this life and how even the greatest of figures in the affairs of men, whose decisions affect the course of human history, have no claim to even one second more than the time that God has allotted them.  And once that time has ended, their dynamic presence in the world, which seemed positively inexhaustible and irrepressible, ends suddenly and forever.

The chair behind the desk in the Supreme Court chambers where Justice Scalia once toiled and pondered weighty issues of law is now empty, where only days before it had held one of the world’s most influential men.  The law clerks who were honored to work for him are suddenly without an employer.  The cases in which his vote would have been decisive are now in suspense as America awaits the new Justice who will replace the fallen one as if he had never lived and breathed upon this earth.

And so it is for each of us in our own much smaller circles of influence. When our time has come we will disappear not only from our families but also from the scenes of our familiar presence, where we were always expected the next day, the next week, the next year.  “For all flesh is as grass; and all the glory thereof as the flower of grass. The grass is withered, and the flower thereof is fallen away (1 Peter 1:24).”

We can only pray for the grace of enough time to contemplate our approaching end rather than to have it come upon us without warning.  Such a grace was given to the traditional Catholic writer Mario Palmaro, dying of liver cancer, whose final interview is a sobering spiritual lesson for us all:

    The greatest suffering I experience is the idea of having to leave this world which I am so fond of and is so beautiful even if also so tragic; of having to leave many friends and relatives; but most of all, of having to leave my wife and children who are still at a tender age. 

    Sometimes I imagine my home, my empty study, and the life that will continue there even if I am no longer present. It is a scene that hurts, but it is extremely realistic: it makes me realize what a useless servant I have been, and that all the books I have written, the conferences and articles, are nothing but straw. But my hope is in the mercy of the Lord, and in the fact that others will pick up part of my aspirations and battles and will continue on in “the ancient duel.” 

As John Paul II admitted, following the Second Vatican Council there was a loss of a “pastoral style” that was “profoundly personal” because it involved sermons that reminded each person that “at the end you will present yourself before God with your entire life. Before His judgment seat you will be responsible for all your actions, you will be judged not only on your actions and on your words but also on your thoughts, even the most secret.”

These sermons, John Paul further admitted, “stirred his conscience, they threw him to his knees, they led him to the screen of the confessional, they had a proving saving effect all their own.” But since the Council, the late Pope was forced to concede, “people have become insensitive to the Last Things” and “preachers, catechists, teachers… no longer have the courage to preach the threat of hell.”  Such is the crisis in the Church today, where we see “pardon,” eclipsing repentance, “mercy” eclipsing justice, and a Jesus who, contrary to the Creed, “never judges” but only loves all sinners “just as they are.”

Let the sudden passing of a great man, then, remind us of what Our Lady of Fatima warned in her Fourth Apparition: “Many souls go to Hell because they have no one to pray for them or make sacrifices for them.” Catholics everywhere should be praying for the repose of the soul of Antonin Scalia. Let not the diabolical confusion of our time obscure, for any of us, the realities of Death, Judgment, Heaven and Hell that stand at the heart of the Message of Fatima, so shamefully neglected by the leaders of the Church in the midst of the worst crisis in her history.

The Perfect Man is a Perfect Son, Perfectly Obedient to the Fourth Commandment


"There are five types of offenses and blasphemies committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary: 
  •         Blasphemies against the Immaculate Conception.

  •         Blasphemies against Her Perpetual Virginity.

  •         Blasphemies against Her Divine Maternity, in refusing at the same time to recognize Her as the Mother of men.

  •         The blasphemies of those who publicly seek to sow in the hearts of children indifference or scorn, or even hatred of this Immaculate Mother.

  •         The offenses of those who outrage Her directly in Her holy images. Here, My daughter, is the reason why the Immaculate Heart of Mary inspired Me to ask for this little act of Reparation ... 

It is also true that the gravest sins against the Most Holy Virgin are first of all sins against faith. This important lesson must be kept in mind."

--Sister Lucia of Fatima, writing to her confessor a message given to her by Our Lord 

_____________

In a world of darkness, we have been given a means to dwell in the light.  Why not seek refuge in devotion to the Immaculate Heart as Our Lord desires?  Why not listen to the Virgen, who offers us a means of finding mercy from God?

16 February 2016

A Very Good Metaphor

I saw this on Facebook and had to share:

I'm starting to thing that this is the last season of America and the writers are just going nuts.

15 February 2016

Continued Good News from Northeast Missouri-- Increased Availability of the Traditional Mass: "The Young People Want It."

The Latin Mass Society of Northeast Missouri has done very good work in the last few years in promoting the ancient Mass in a diocese that has not been particularly open to it in the past several decades.

Continuing an initiative of the LMS, the Truman State University Newman Center, and the FSSP, the TLM is available again on Sunday this February 28 at 4 pm, at St. Rose of Lima in Novinger.  This location is very convenient for students at Truman State University, hence this article in the Truman State Index (I applaud the news editor of this student publication and the reporter, who seem to understand the importance of the event and the workings of the Traditional Mass from a basic theological perspective as well). Apart from this initiative, the closest approved TLM to the school is in Quincy, Illinois (about an hour and a half away).  Heading to St. Louis or Kansas City means a trip of three hours or more.

From the Index article:

Sophomore Paige Karls says she attended Latin Mass before and really enjoyed the quiet and the reverence she felt. Karls says when she arrived at Truman, there was no Latin Mass offered, but a group of Truman State’s Catholic Newman Center students, as well as some members of the Kirksville community, wanted one.

Sophomore Jackie Jacezko says she attended Latin Mass for the first time Jan. 24. Jacezko said she thought she had a deeper understanding despite not knowing the language. Jacezko says she thinks the lack of language comprehension creates a greater sense of reverence by removing the memorized responses, so meditation becomes easier.

“It’s humbling,” Jacezko says. “Everyone is focused on the same thing. The priest facing the same way that the congregation is facing points people to the real reason they’re at Mass.”

So, congratulations to our friends up North, and hopefully they will be able to establish at least an every Sunday TLM soon.

13 February 2016

Justice Antonin Scalia, Requiescat in Pace





Justice Scalia is dead.

There is so much that can be said, but I'll keep it brief, with my immediate thoughts, in no particular order:

1. The intellectual force of the Court is dead; fitting, as the rule of law died at the hands of the same Court.

2. No human judge is perfect, and Scalia could be faulted for a number of opinions, but taken in all he was the greatest Justice that served the Court since Roger Taney, if not ever. Certainly his deft skewering of the idiocy of the Court's recent civilization-killing agenda will be sorely missed.

3. I coached a mock trial team of local homeschoolers, and at the national finals banquet dinner in June 2015 we were privileged to hear remarks by Justice Scalia. A memory I will keep.

4. You can now let go any dream you had of the Court blocking the Obama parents-of-USC-children legalization edict.

5. For that matter, we will feel the loss of protection against the sure to come future deprivations of what used to be considered rights. At least he will miss the "fun" our leaders have in store for us.

6. I hope there is an autopsy. But then again, Kennedy had an autopsy.

7. One could not but help note that Scalia was one of those radical trads that Dave Armstrong fears so much. In other words, he was a Catholic who took his faith and vocation seriously. His intellect was informed and guided by his faith. His faith was rooted in the timeless tradition and the ancient liturgy that safeguards it. His writings reflected his Catholic mind. Only the Catholic Church is the foundation of true culture.

Eternal rest grant unto him O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him. May he rest in peace. Amen.

May the soul of Antonin Scalia, and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God rest in peace. Amen.




12 February 2016

Ecce Sacerdos Magnus

And the "Great Cardinal", indeed, as this wonderful post calls him. Privileged as we in Saint Louis have been to have been his subjects, and to get to know his kind, steadfast and charitable character, I do not tire of highlighting His Eminence's work for the faith.

The Q&A posted at the link above is very enlightening.  It should be read very carefully.  Cardinal Burke speaks very carefully, and the things he says, how he says them, and what is unsaid, are all equally important.